How to hire good people

As a founder, growing a company on your own can be a demanding .This therefore calls for the effort of skilled people to help you carry out some of the necessary business operations. Virtually all flourished businesses have had great employees on the steer wheel.

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Well, after showing the need for employees, here is the question-how to hire good people to are not only skilled but also “good.”In today’s economy, finding the best people to work as your employees is more important than ever before. No business manager can stand to lose time, money as well as results from a poor hiring choice! There are way dire consequences that go along hiring the right person for the wrong job.

The costs of finding, interrogating, conversing, engaging as well as training only to end up with bad employee are insurmountable. Most managers see their employees as investments and therefore expect excellent if not good ROI.

Here are “7 C’s” to help you hire good people
1. Competent: this is one of the most crucial factors that you have to consider when hiring. What are the potential employee’s skills, experiences as well as education that are relevant in this case?
2. Capability: Will the potential employee complete assigned tasks as well as new ones that will require him to use creativity and effort to work out? Being capable in this case means the employee has the potential, willingness and capability and responsibility required to help your company meet its objectives.
3. Compatible: Can this employee comfortably go along with other employees and colleagues? More importantly, can he fit perfectly with the current team that he is expected to join?
4. Commitment: Is the potential employee particular with working with you’re for long-term or is just a passerby? Always target for something way better. The candidate’s job history is a clear indication of the level of commitment he provides.
5. Character: Does the potential employee have a character that you want portrayed in all your employees? Does he keep promises or even tell the truth? Is he selfish or a team player?
6. Culture: Each and every business out there has its own culture or simply a way in which people interact or behave to one another. Culture is always based on specific values, procedures, policies and expectations that all influence the attitude of an employee as well as the leader. Employees who don’t fit to a particular system tend to be difficult and disruptive.
7. Compensation: You are the employer so make sure that you agree with the potential candidate on the favorable market-based compensation. Make sure that he/she is fine with what he/she has been offered. If he/she is not satisfied with the package, automatically the employee will feel unappreciated thereby underperforming his roles.

Ask the potential employee to give answers to the 7 category of questions. You may modestly present or exaggerate them. Remember, you are looking for the truth and nothing but the truth.

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What is more important-good service or good food?

In the restaurant industry, offering good service and poor quality food will always beat poor service and good quality food every time. Believe me or not, we all wish it weren’t so. We all yearn for a place on earth where seasonal ingredients and quality food win over immoderately cheerful waiters and a theatrical atmosphere.

But experience says otherwise.

For quite a long time now, we know there have been complaints from dissatisfied clients and requests for restaurant recommendations. In both cases, service matters.

Complaints that are service related outnumber the food related issues by a ratio of 10:1. You may never hear many complaints such as scorched beans, concealed sausages, or drab presentations-but complaints of basis of rude service and unobservant waiters that sets customer’s fingers a-typing and their blood a-boiling.

Honestly, it may sound ironical but we mention the quality of food last on the page. For instance, when a reader requests for a recommendation, his/her criterion is (in order of priority) the cost, atmosphere and service; with food, if at all mentioned, at the bottom of the page. Some people are more concerned with what’s happening out than in the inside.

Here is what will make you agree with my statement. I mentioned atmosphere (lighting, music, and decor) as subsets of service due to the fact that it indicates the treatment that customers get. This is the first thing you will hear from a customer who has just entered a nice restaurant, “Wow, this place makes me feel …”This is an indication that he/she is at home! Unfortunately, there are places that offer top class quality meals but if you really miss out on this statement, God bless you.”

Ideally, great food and excellent service are known to be mutually exclusive concepts. Therefore, customers ought to demand and receive nothing but both of these. But the point here is exercising that quality is more important as compared to service. Also in my honest opinion, for any business to survive, quality is a MUST and there is no contest on this bit. This era and age is different. Clients want quality but may necessarily ask for it. They imagine it’s obvious to give them quality that matches their sacrifice. Look here, excellent food anywhere in the world, when paired with lousy services makes a recipe for bankruptcy.

There are way numerous reasons also why service is very critical to the average breakfast. One, almost all service issues will be easier to understand. People may find it difficult to articulate dissatisfaction in regard to a specific dish (you know it when you hear this “It was just OK”), but misplaced orders or an absent waiter is all too simple to go along with. Most of us go out to a restaurant purely for excellent meal experiences. We all go out for fun and it should be what we get. So, either of the two is very important but quality must remain uncompromised. With good quality, even with minor challenges, clients may be willing to give you another try but not the other way round. Balance the two and you will have the best possible experiences with your customers.

 

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Franchise or family-what to do with your restaurant

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When franchises and family businesses are mentioned together, what comes into the mind of the listener is that the family owns the franchise. Several families own businesses that leverage existing brands through the medium of franchising. Some of the biggest restaurant franchises are owned by families. Most are husband-wife owned. Each of them holding a position; the manager while the other one as a co-owner/assistant. Others are father-son owned and the combination is endless.

Franchising is one of the most popular ways of getting into business because the franchisee or franchise owner has an easy access to an already established brand with proven business systems that are supported by existing companies that have been successful in at least a specific location or franchisor. So, it’s not surprising why many families are starting franchising businesses. The term franchising technically means a license or agreement between parties (basically two) giving a group or person (usually the franchisee) a right to market the products or services by way of a trade name or trademark of another (franchisor)

Franchising is a little bit more prevalent than you may think. Most industries nowadays use franchises as a means of distributing their products or services. Again, you should not be surprised to hear 70% of these are owned by families. Families own franchises as well .Most of them have shifted to franchising in a bid to grow their product’s brands without the need to raise significant capital for purposes of expansion.

Because franchising models allow growth of family businesses using other people’s resources it can be very lucrative. In addition to payment of upfront fees for development of the franchises, the franchises pay an ongoing percentage of total revenue to franchisors typically in the range of 4-6 percent. But going into franchising requires good investments in terms of resources and risks are also not ruled out. So, before franchising you will need to do proper and careful planning for your future venture.

One of the biggest family owned franchises is Big Boys restaurants, a well known family business franchise. It roots from Samuel Frisch’s Café that was started back in 1905.He later passed this franchise over to his three of nine of his children in 1923.today, it’s grown and the franchise business is not what it was several years back.

Families have become successful from this franchising model, for both franchisees and franchisors. However those families that are intending to use the franchising model in a bid to grow their business must understand that investment is a key for success. In spite of the royalties required and regular fees, you may lack the capital to get you going or even a team to oversee the franchise quality. These are two very critical factors for franchising. If you don’t have enough resources for the above stated factors then consider starting a restaurant venture business.

Apart from building a franchising model with a win-win situation for both parties, you also need to offer great services as a business. This includes purchasing, employee training development of technology among others. Also, make sure you have great recruiting team to help you hire the right people to work with you. Whichever way you may choose to follow, make sure you adhere to the industry’s own rules and regulations so that you are on the safe side.